One way to distinguish yourself academically and professionally is by earning both a Master of Science degree and a certificate in International Food Law. At Michigan State University you may pursue both an M.S. and a certificate in International Food Law at the same time.

The combined programs allow a number of credits from the certificate program to count toward elective credits in the other program. Thus it is possible to earn both your M.S. degree and a certificate in International Food Law in less time.

If you are considering a combined program, you need to apply and be accepted into your choice of master’s program. It is recommended that admission to the master’s program be obtained before accumulation of credits in either program.

Combined MSU Graduate Programs:

  • International Food Law Certificate
  • Agriculture Economics
  • Food Safety
  • Food Science
  • Packaging
  • Global Food Law

 

International Food Law Certificate

There are nine (9) online international food law courses available from the Institute for Food Laws & Regulations (IFLR) at Michigan State University (MSU) worth three credits each. Upon successful completion of any four (4) of these courses, you will receive a certificate from Michigan State University indicating your successful completion of our International Food Law Distance Education Certificate Program.

For more information, please visit:  International Food Law Certificate Program

 

Agriculture Economics

The combined master’s of science degree and international food law certificate may be obtained under Plan B (without a thesis). The program consists of at least 39 total credits, of which, at least 12 course credits are in agricultural economics, and at least 9 shall be at the 800 level or above, and 12 course credits in international food law. 

Core Curriculum for Master’s of Science Degree

All students are expected to obtain sufficient economic theory, mathematics, and statistics to interpret economic data effectively and to obtain practical research results for themselves and others. They are also expected to develop a general familiarity with the content, approaches and historical development of agricultural economics and its supporting disciplines. 

International Food Law Component

Students must take Food Regulation in the U.S. (FSC 811, Section 730) and International Food Law (FSC 810, Section 730), plus two more international food law courses.

Example how a program might look:

Before

Summer 1

Fall 1

Spring 2

Summer 2

(Online)

6 credits food laws distance education 

 (At MSU, East Lansing) 

 Intensive English

 Statistics 430

(At MSU, East Lansing)

AEC 801 Math for Economists

AEC 805 Microeconomic theory

AEC 857 Strat. Management in
Ag. Business

AEC 810 Inst. & Behav. Econ

(At MSU, East Lansing)

AEC 835 Econometrics

Plus 2 of following:

  • AEC 865 Ag. Benefit Cost
  • AEC 817 Ag. Trade Policy
  • AEC 853 Finan Mgt Ag Bus

 (Off-site)

Research credits

 

Food Safety

The online Master of Science in Food Safety program at Michigan State University is a 30-credit Master of Science degree offered through the College of Veterinary Medicine. It is a non-thesis professional masters program intended for mid-career/mid-management working professionals. For more information on the requirements for the M.S. in Food Safety program please visit: http://www.online.foodsafety.msu.edu/.

International Food Law Component

Students must take Food Regulation in the U.S. (FSC 811, Section 730) or International Food Law (FSC 810, Section 730) plus three more international food law courses.

Example how a program might look:

Summer 1

Fall 1

Spring 1

Summer 2

Fall 2

Spring 2

 VM 830
  Fd Safety Research Methods

 

FSC 810
Intl Food Law

VM 817
Pre-harvest Food Safe

 

FSC 812
Food Reg EU

VM 831

VM 811
Food Path

VM 812
Food Safety Toxic

Food Dis Epidem

VM/PKG 814
Pkg Food Safety

FSC 811
Food Reg US

 VM 815 Ap  Proj

 FSC 816, 730
Codex Alimentarius

Food Science

The Food Science Master of Science degree may be obtained under Plan B (without a thesis). The program consists of at least 30 total credits of which at least 16 credits must be food science at the 800 level or above.

A minimum of six credits in the degree program must be earned on campus in order to meet the university residency requirement. Courses required for undergraduate majors in a given program area (i.e., food science or human nutrition) are normally considered collateral for graduate programs in that area and will not be given graduate credit. Graduate students may receive a limited number of graduate credits from undergraduate departmental courses required by their major with approval of the Guidance Committee.

Core Curriculum for Master of Science Degree in Food Science

Students should have taken as undergraduates or will take during the M.S. degree program at least one food science course in three of the four program areas to ensure that they have obtained a broad, well-rounded background in food science. The four program areas and examples of courses included in each area are:

  • Food Processing and Engineering - FSC 429, 430, 431, 432, and 433.
  • Food Chemistry - FSC 401, 455, 801, and 831.
  • Food Safety and Microbiology - FSC 440, 807, 823, 840, 842.
  • Nutrition - HNF 311, 461, 462, 463, 840, 843, 935, 936, 937, and 938.

Plus

  • FSC 892 (seminar, 1 credit)

Example of how a program might look:

Before

Fall Semester
(Odd years)

Spring Semester
(Odd years)

Fall Semester (Even years)

Spring Semester
(Even years)

FSC 810-818
6 credits food laws
distance education

 (Off-site –
the remaining
semesters would
be on the
MSU
East Lansing
campus)

FSC 801 
Adv Food Chem

FSC 82X
Funct Foods

FSC 812-818
Food Law
“x”

STT 464
Stat Biol

FSC 823  
Duet/Imm
Funct

OR

FSC 842   
Adv Disease

FSC 429
Fund Food Eng

FSC 811,  
Food Law US

FSC 807
Adv Food Tox

FSC 83X
Adv Food Proc

FSC 810
International
Food Law

FSC 831
Adv Cereal
Science

FSC 892   
Seminar

FSC 890 sp

FSC 812-818
Food Law “y”

Note:  For more information on the M.S. Food Science, please visit here. here.

International Food Law Component

Students must take Food Regulation in the U.S. (FSC 811, Section 730) plus three more international food law courses.

Packaging

The Master of Science degree in Packaging consists of at least 30 total credits, of which, at least 16 course credits are in packaging and at least 12 course credits in international food law. The core curriculum for the Plan B Master’s of Science degree includes the following minimum requirements:

  • Two credits of PKG 888
  • PKG 827
  • PKG 805 or PKG 815
  • 12 credits in Packaging courses at the 800 level or above, excluding PKG 888, 890, and 899
  • 16 credits in Packaging at the 400 level or higher, excluding PKG 432
  • 16 credits in approved courses at the 800 level or above
  • 30 total credits from approved courses at the 400 level or higher

Note:  Additional courses are required for students without an undergraduate degree in packaging. These are PKG 801 (4 credits), 803 (2 credits), and 804 (2 credits). All three courses are available online.

Example how a program might look:

Fall Semester

  Spring Semester

  Fall Semester

  Spring Semester

  Summer Sem

PKG 827
Polym PKG Mtls

  PKG 828 Proc &
  Appl Pkg Plastics

  PKG 875 or
  PKG 891

  PKG 805 Adv
  Pkg Dynamics

 PKG 888 Plan B Project

FSC 811
Food Reg US

  PKG 815 Perm
  & Shelf Life

  FSC 810
  International Food Law

 FSC 812-818 “y”
 Food Law

 PKG 891 Indep. Study

  ANR 812-818 “x”
  Food Law

For more information on the requirements for the on-line M.S. in Packaging program please visit here. For more information on the on-campus M.S. degree, please visit  here.